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Representative Meyer Jacobstein of New York, Congressional Record

Congressional Record transcript

Preferred Citation:
Representative Meyer Jacobstein of New York, Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st session, April 8, 1924, vol 65, part 6 (Washington, D: Government Printing Office, 1924), 5861 – 5864... (read more)

Representative Meyer Jacobstein of New York, Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st session, April 8, 1924, vol. 65, part 6 (Washington, D.: Government Printing Office, 1924), 5861 – 5864.

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Transcription:
“Perhaps the chief argument expressed or implied by those favoring the Johnson bill [the National Origins Act] is that the new immigrant is not of a type that can be assimilated or that he will not carry on the best traditions o... (read more)

“Perhaps the chief argument expressed or implied by those favoring the Johnson bill [the National Origins Act] is that the new immigrant is not of a type that can be assimilated or that he will not carry on the best traditions of the founders of our Nation, but, on the contrary, is likely to fill our jails, our almshouses, and other institutions that impose a great tax burden on the Nation.

Based on this prejudice and dislike, there has grown up an almost fanatical anti-immigration sentiment. But this charge against the newcomers is denied, and substantial evidence has been brought to prove that they do not furnish a disproportionate share of the inmates of these institutions . . .

The trouble is that the committee is suffering from a delusion. It is carried away with the belief that there is such a thing as a Nordic race which possesses all the virtues, and in like manner creates the fiction of an inferior group of peoples, for which no name has been invented.

Nothing is more un-American. Nothing could be more dangerous, in a land the Constitution of which says that all men are created equal, than to write into our law a theory which puts one race above another, which stamps one group of people as superior and another as inferior. The fact that it is camouflaged in a maze of statistics will not protect this Nation from the evil consequences of such an unscientific, un-American, wicked philosophy.”

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