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President Richard Nixon Departing the White House on the Presidential Helicopter for the Last Time as President

President Richard Nixon, smiling with arms and fingers raised in the "V" sign, stands at the entrance to the Presidential Helicopter, Marine/Army One on the White House lawn. A serviceman stands next to the gangplank. The helicopter pilot is visible behind the glass pane of the cockpit.
President (1969-1974 : Nixon). White House Photo Office. 1969-1974
27250
Photographic Print
President Richard Nixon Departing the White House on the Presidential Helicopter for the Last Time as President. Photograph. August 9, 1974. National Archives and Records Administration, White House Photo Office Collection (Nixon Administration), 1/20/1969 - 8/9/1974. https://catalog.archives.gov/id/66394382

In 1974, the Supreme Court issued a ruling about President Richard Nixon’s claim of executive privilege. This ruling, in which the Court attempted to qualify unchecked limits on executive privilege, came toward the end of the Watergate scandal. Congress had been investigating a burglary at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, DC. People associated with the break-in had connections to President Nixon himself. These congressional hearings revealed that Nixon had a recording device in the Oval Office, and Congress requested the tapes be turned over to them for their criminal investigation. Nixon refused to hand over the tapes. On July 8, 1974, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in United States v. Nixon on whether President Nixon’s claim of executive privilege was constitutional. The Court’s opinion, excerpted in the document, explains why an unchecked executive poses potential risks for the nation. What reasoning did the court provide for why it needed to set limits on Nixon? What did the court say in general about the value of executive privilege?

In 1974, the Supreme Court issued a ruling about President Richard Nixon’s claim of executive privilege. This ruling, in which the Court attempted to qualify unchecked limits on executive privilege, came toward the end of the Watergate scandal. Congress had been investigating a burglary at the Democrat National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, DC. People associated with the break-in had connections to President Nixon himself. These congressional hearings revealed that Nixon had a recording device in the Oval Office, and Congress requested the tapes be turned over to them for their criminal investigation. Nixon refused to hand over the tapes. On July 8, 1974, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in United States v. Nixon on whether President Nixon’s claim of executive privilege was constitutional. The Court’s opinion, excerpted in the document, explained why an unchecked executive poses potential risks for the nation. The Court also clarified areas that affirmed the value of executive privilege. An additional helpful link: https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/418/683/case.html Audio Recording of Majority Opinion Audio: https://www.oyez.org/cases/1973/73-1766 9:45-13:20 OR 11:35-13:20; 14:38-16:15 (You can clip this!)