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11.2.1 Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragists

Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, N.J., leading the sixteen members of the National Womans Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, D.C. July 14, 1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines of $25 each, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.
International Film Service
6392
Photographic Print

International Film Service. Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragists. Photograph. July 1917. National Archives and Records Administration, Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, 1860 - 1952. https://catalog.archives.gov/id/45568320

This photograph was taken during a protest in Washington, DC, in 1917, nearly six years after women in California won the right to vote, but still nearly three years before women were granted that right at the federal level. Many of the women in this photograph — members of the National Woman’s Party — were arrested shortly after this picture was taken because they were picketing in front of a public place, which required a permit they did not have. These suffragists regularly faced arrest, trial, and incarceration. How do you think these protests and arrests served as strategies for women to get the attention of policy makers? How do events like this help us answer the question, How did women convince men to grant them the right to vote?

This photograph was taken during a protest in Washington, DC, in 1917, nearly six years after women in California won the right to vote, but still nearly three years before women were granted that right at the federal level. Many of the women in this photograph — members of the National Woman’s Party (the more radical alternative to the more moderate National American Woman Suffrage Association, NAWSA) — were arrested shortly after this picture was taken because they were picketing in front of a public place, which required a permit they did not have. These suffragists regularly faced arrest, trial, and incarceration. In the context of World War I, protests like this shone a light on suffragists’ anger over national leaders’ committing the nation to war without women being able to vote for leaders. As you guide students through this document, the following questions may be useful: How do you think these protests and arrests served as strategies for women to get the attention of policy makers? How do events like this help us answer the question, How did women convince men to grant them the right to vote?

BASTILLE DAY SPELLS PRISON FOR SIXTEEN SUFFRAGISTS WHO PICKETED WHITE HOUSE.

Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, N.J., leading the sixteen members of the National Woman's Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Wash., D.C., July 14 1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquah, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines of $25 each, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.