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11.11.2a 504 poster, San Francisco, 1977

Poster in support of the historic twenty-five-day occupation of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare offices in San Francisco. Ken Stein carried this picket sign (which he created) during the 504 demonstration.
Stein, Ken
1977
Poster

Poster, Sign 504 Now!, 1977; photo courtesy, copyright Ken Stein

The Longmore Institute, one of the most important disability rights centers in the country, headquartered at San Francisco State University, produced this text and film clip that offer context about the significance of the 504, the law that granted the right of people with disabilities to have access to federally funded programs and facilities. Based on this text and the film clip, what sorts of places and programs did people with disabilities gain access to? Why did activists use the strategy of sit-ins? Why was it important for activists to fight in public for inclusion? Thousands of students in California have 504 plans, which come straight from this law and help students receive necessary accommodations to help them succeed in school. The disability rights movement worked in ways that are similar to and different from other civil rights movements. How do you think this story connects with what you’ve learned about other kinds of social justice movements and forms of activism? What could inclusion mean beyond issues of accessibility (of spaces or content)?
The Longmore Institute, one of the most important disability rights centers in the country, headquartered at San Francisco State University, produced this text and film clip that offer context about the significance of the 504, the law that granted the right of people with disabilities to have access to federally funded programs and facilities. As teachers are well aware, thousands of students in California have 504 plans, which come straight from this law and help students receive necessary accommodations to help them succeed in school. Make sure your students understand the connections between the law, special education, and the importance of equity in education. Also make sure they are clear about how this law opened up access for people with disabilities to places and programs. In many ways, the disability rights movement employed strategies that were similar to and different from other civil rights movements. Activists borrowed tactics from the Black freedom struggles. Ask your students to consider how this kind of activism connects with other kinds of social justice movements and forms of activism they have studied in eleventh grade.

Poster with text that says: Sign 504 Now! photo courtesy, copyright Ken Stein