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Mexico - Sonora, Yaqui Indians, enlisted in the Mexican Army, being transported by box cars

between 1890 and 1923
Photograph

Mexico - Sonora, Yaqui Indians, enlisted in the Mexican Army, being transported by box cars. Mexico, None. [Between 1890 and 1923] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/96516435/.

A corrido is a song that narrates events. Corridos became popular in Mexico in the 1800s, but during the Mexican Revolution songwriters composed many more, about battles, fighters, and leaders. This corrido is one of the most popular and has been sung in many different versions over the years. It is about a famous woman from the state of Durango who joined the revolution in its early stages and fell in love with General Madero. Male writers of most corridos in the revolution wrote love songs about soldaderas rather than celebrations of their fighting ability and military contributions. Why do you think corrido writers represented women this way?

One of the most common ways that Mexicans spread and received information about the revolution was through corridos — ballads in a traditional Mexican style that often narrated historical events. There are numerous recordings of this corrido on YouTube. Most corridos of the revolution represent women as lovers rather than comrades-in-arms and thus present an image of soldaderas as militarily insignificant, motivated by passion, and therefore less threatening to the traditional gender norms. “La Adelita” is represented as both beautiful and valiant, characteristics not often found together in the same woman (according to most men who wrote the corridos), and thus exceptional for her power over men.