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1.5.7 Hupa Children Participating in a Native American Pride Celebration on July 4

Jack Norton (Hupa and Cherokee) and his wife, Jana Norton, took this photograph of Hupa children participating in a Native American pride celebration during the 4th of July. The girls have their hair in braids and wear basket hats expertly woven by Hupa women. The boy on the left holds a painted drum and drumstick. Other boys hold white sticks used in an Indigenous ball game.  
Norton, Jack
July 4, circa 1970s
Photograph
Photo in the personal collection of Jack Norton

Hupa children participating in a Native American pride celebration on July 4. Photograph courtesy of and with permission of Jack and Jana Norton.

Jack Norton (Hupa and Cherokee) and his wife, Jana Norton, took this photograph of Hupa children participating in a Native American pride celebration during the 4th of July. The girls have their hair in braids and wear basket hats expertly woven by Hupa women. The boy on the left holds a painted drum and drumstick. Other boys hold white sticks used in an Indigenous ball game.
Jack Norton (Hupa and Cherokee) and his wife, Jana Norton, took this photograph of Hupa children participating in a Native American pride celebration on July 4 in the 1970s. The girls have their hair in braid and wear basket hats, expertly woven by Hupa women. The boy on the left hold a painted drum and drum stick. Other boys hold white sticks used in an Indigenous ball game.   The children are all Hupa. Hupa are Athabascan speakers. They share a language family with the Dine of Canada and the Apache and Navajo of Arizona and New Mexico. It is a language unique in Northern California. Hupa are not farmers but are hunting, fishing (salmon), and gathering people.  

Hupa children participating in a Native American pride celebration on July 4, circa 1970s.