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1.5.5 Seder Opens Observance of Passover for Families

Seder opens observance of Passover for families, 1962, by Jeff Goldwater, Photograph article dated April 26, 1962 partially reads, "The lighting at sundown Wednesday of festival candles at the Seder Table commemorated the beginning of Passover, the Festival of Freedom, for Jews throughout the world. The Seder Service is observed in Jewish homes the first and second days of Passover, when the youngest child in the family asks four traditional questions about the holiday. Answers to these questions explain the meaning of Passover symbols and tell of the escape of the Jews from Egypt, their adventures at the Red Sea and in the desert. The remainder of the service is devoted to responses by the family group from the Hagaddah, a prayer book containing stories, interpretations, songs and prayers." Pictured are Joani Dinerstein, 4, and Rabbi Morris D. Margolis (forefront), and Lester Dinerstein, Mrs. Bernard Dinerstein, Mrs. Margolis, Cecelia and Stephen Wolf, seated at the Sedar Table, from left.
Goldwater, Jeff
April 26, 1962
Photograph

Seder opens observance of Passover for families, 1962, by Jeff Goldwater, Valley Times Photo Collection, Los Angeles Public Library.

 

This is a Jewish family during a seder meal, which is held to celebrate Passover, an important holiday for Jewish people. Traditionally, the youngest child in the family will ask four questions about the holiday and will receive the answers to those questions in the symbolism of the food on the table. Do you share any special meals with your family?
Jewish children who celebrate Passover may participate in a seder meal during the first and second days of Passover. The seder meal tells of the escape of the Hebrews from Egypt and Pharaoh to the land of Canaan, and includes the crossing of the Red Sea and the time in the desert.

Photograph of family gathered around a table for a religious ceremony.